No Need To Call Argumentative Essay

Criticism 24.11.2019
No need to call argumentative essay

That is where I am. Many other people are in the same situation as Audrey in the sense that they truly feel as if they need their smartphones in their life. But why?

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Without need too obvious, it might be worth pointing this out when you address the opposition. Great conclusions get your readers to check the "I Agree" box on your call essay. So much has happened since you stated your thesis in the introduction!

Texting and instant messages allows us to create yet another "persona" where we sound more perfect than we do in real life, because we are able to take those few moment in between texting to do so. We are changing so much that teenagers and kids are even being praised on their ability to text. Davis: You also say that another bedrock of conversation is solitude and self-reflection. Why do you think technologies, specifically, are responsible for eroding our ability to be alone? And that you can slip in and out of wherever you are to be wherever you want to be, with no social stigma. We are telling people that they are not as interesting or informative as where we can go in a flash [on our devices]. You could say that this is a radical code of individualism—so radical that we deny the power of all communal affiliations even as we participate in them. So we are in one confusing soup. It certainly leads right back to people [being] in conflict, which is one of my big themes. But not now. You just want to. Feeling unthreatened when someone wants to end a conversation may seem a small thing, but it is not. It calls upon a sense of self-worth; one needs to be at a place where Audrey has not arrived. It is easier to avoid the phone; its beginnings and endings are too rough on her. Audrey is not alone in this. Friendships get broken. Pretty much the same. You can create who you want to be. You can say what kind of stereotype mold you want to fit in without But you can pull it off on the Internet. Audrey has her cell phone and its camera with her all day; all day she takes pictures and posts them to Facebook. She boasts that she has far more Facebook photo albums than any of her friends. Audrey is preoccupied about which photographs to post. Which put her in the best light? All my memories would probably go along with it. And other people have posted pictures of me. All of that would be lost. If Facebook were undone, I might actually freak out That is where I am. If everything is archived, Audrey worries that she will never be able to escape the Internet twin. That thought is not so nice. But if everything is archived, at least in fantasy, she will never have to give her up. That thought is kind of nice. On Facebook, Audrey works on the twin, and the twin works on her. She receives a good response from Facebook friends, and so she ramps up the flirtatious tone. The response is not so good, and she retreats. Audrey uses the same kind of tinkering as she experiments with her avatars in virtual worlds. Change your avatar, change your world. Audrey says that her online avatars boost her real-life confidence. Like many other young women on Second Life, Audrey makes her avatar more conventionally attractive than she is in the real. Audrey is a pretty girl, with long red hair, styled in a single braid down her back. Her braid and her preference for floral prints give her an old-fashioned look. There are no floral prints. For Audrey, as for many of her peers, the answer is unequivocally yes. Online life is practice to make the rest of life better, but it is also a pleasure in itself. Teenagers spend hours depleting allowances, shopping for clothes and shoes for their online selves. These virtual goods have real utility; they are required for avatars with full social lives. During her sophomore year at Roosevelt, Audrey met a group of Italian exchange students. They introduced her to the site. At that point, Audrey had taken one year of high school Italian, just enough to build a profile with some help from her friends. She admits that this profile bears only a glancing relationship to the truth. On Italian MySpace, Audrey is older and more experienced. When her profile went up, a lot of men sent her messages in Italian. She found this thrilling and responded enthusiastically. You have to pick a topic that allows you to take a position that can be supported by actual, researched evidence. Quick note: you could write an argumentative paper over the general idea that dogs are better than cats—or visa versa! For example, a strong argumentative topic could be proving that dogs make better assistance animals than cats do. While some people might dislike the taste of water, there is an overwhelming body of evidence that proves—beyond the shadow of a doubt—that drinking water is a key part of good health. Choose a Topic That You Find Interesting Topics that have local, national, or global relevance often also resonate with us on a personal level. Consider choosing a topic that holds a connection between something you know or care about and something that is relevant to the rest of society. For example, if you are a huge football fan, a great argumentative topic for you might be arguing whether football leagues need to do more to prevent concussions. And not only is this a great argumentative topic: you also get to write about one of your passions! Think of your thesis as the trunk of a tree. Its job is to support your arguments—which are like the branches. What do you do now? You establish your position on the topic by writing a killer thesis statement! In more concrete terms, a thesis statement conveys your point of view on your topic, usually in one sentence toward the end of your introduction paragraph. Your thesis statement tells your reader what your argument is, then the rest of your essay shows and explains why your argument is logical. Why does an argumentative essay need a thesis, though? Well, the thesis statement—the sentence with your main claim—is actually the entire point of an argumentative essay. Got it? Many people are often hypnotized by their phones, making them incapable of multitasking. They become oblivious to the world around them, even in the most important times. We are asking kids to read homework on a device that also gives them access to everything that matters to them: Facebook. How did you negotiate these things with your own daughter? I have two daughters, 16 and 12, and my experience is that you have to choose your battles… We did the sacred space thing. And it mostly worked. First that all, and talking about the user, the program could be apt for any age. In fact, on its home page they promote the courses for all ages, levels and needs. There is no evidence on the page that could restrict the age in each level.

And why waste a whole paragraph—the very last thing your audience is going to read—on just repeating yourself? One thing you want to avoid in your conclusion, though: presenting new supporting needs or new evidence. That can just be confusing for your reader. A Strong Argumentative Essay: Examples For some essay argumentative essay writers, showing is better than telling.

Facebook has 2. In call, Mark Zuckerberg himself supports adopting a global framework for privacy and data protection, which would protect more users than before.

No need to call argumentative essay

Ask yourself: calls this make a claim that some people might agree with, but others might disagree with? The answer is yes. Also, there are definitely good, reliable sources out there that will help this writer prove their argument. So this paper is off to a strong need The topic sentence should make a point that gets right at that, instead of throwing out a random fact about data mining.

For example, it would be a great idea to include exactly what Mark Zuckerberg said! A Better Argument Example Body Paragraph: Over the past several years, one of the biggest consequences of the lack of regulation of social media platforms has been the mining of Facebook user data, which has been exposed by the news media and the U. Text-Messaging Championship The thought that these kids grew up with these technologies and were taught how to use them at such a young age are very interesting.

Turkle also talks about this in this chapter, she describes it as "Overwhelmed across the Generations" Many of these older generations who did not grow up with the technologies we have now, are trying to incorporate themselves and become a part of them. When I ask people why they do that, they admit it—they say, we text during the boring bits.

What does it mean for somebody to say, I went to a funeral and when the funeral got boring, I texted? What have they argumentative about the purposes of a funeral? And what are they teaching their children?

They forgot that the point of the funeral is just to be together with the other people there. We are call, with our children, in our romantic relationships, in our educational system, at work, that we are not paying attention to each other. We are not talking to each other with full attention. The book also provides theorists who might have focused on specific angles of CALL with a broader argumentative and conceptual essay of the field.

The name is a fairly essay one: the existence of CALL in the academic literature has been recognizable for about the last thirty years. Hope and prayer are an expectation and belief in something over which one has little or no control. I have control over the conversation and also more control over what I say. When you instant-message you can cross things out, edit what you say, block a person, when do students begin learning to write an essay sign off.

A phone conversation is a lot of pressure. You have to just keep going. Then Audrey makes up a new word. But not now. You just want to. Feeling unthreatened when someone wants to end a conversation may seem a small thing, but it is not.

It calls upon a sense of self-worth; one needs to be at a place where Audrey has not arrived.

She explains that when bad news came in an instant message, she was able to compose herself. It made it easier to hear. I could take it in pieces. It gives them an alternative to processing emotions in real time. Under stress, they seek composure above all. But they do not find equanimity. When they meet and lose composure, they find a new way to flee: often they take their phones out to text each other and friends not in the room. They keep themselves from people who could help. But like many of those I study, I have been complicit with technology in removing many voices from my life. I had plans for dinner with a colleague, Joyce. On the day before we were to meet, my daughter got admitted to college. I e-mailed Joyce that we would have much to celebrate. She e-mailed back a note of congratulations. She had been through the college admissions process with her children and understood my relief. Joyce and I both felt constrained by a new etiquette but were also content to follow it. Both Joyce and I have gained something we are not happy about wanting. License to feel together when alone, comforted by e-mails, excused from having to attend to people in real time. We did not set out to avoid the voice but end up denying ourselves its pleasures. And now there are applications that automatically transcribe voicemail into text. I interview Maureen, a college freshman, who is thrilled to have discovered one of these programs. Too long to listen to. Now, I can scroll through the voicemail as text messages. People have long wanted to connect with those at a distance. We sent letters, then telegrams, and then the telephone gave us a way to hear their voices. Then, short of time, people began to use the phone instead of getting together. Then, this machine, originally designed as a way to leave a message if someone was not at home, became a screening device, our end-of-millennium Victorian calling card. Over time, voicemail became an end in itself, not the result of a frustrated telephone call. People began to call purposely when they knew that no one would be home. E-mail gives you more control over your time and emotional exposure. But then, it, too, was not fast enough. With mobile connectivity think text and Twitter , we can communicate our lives pretty much at the rate we live them. But the system backfires. We express ourselves in staccato texts, but we send out a lot and often to large groups. So we get even more back—so many that the idea of communicating with anything but texts seems too exhausting. Why would we deprive ourselves of that? Listening can only slow you down. A voice recording can be sped up a bit, but it has to unfold in real time. Better to have it transcribed or avoid it altogether. We work so hard to give expressive voices to our robots but are content not to use our own. Like the letters they replace, e-mail, messaging, texting, and, more recently, Tweeting carry a trace of the voice. Hers is a story of trying to rebalance things in a traditional framework. We have met Trey, her law partner. He confronts something different, something he cannot rebalance. I called him when I saw the blog entry. I was mad at him. The topic sentence should make a point that gets right at that, instead of throwing out a random fact about data mining. For example, it would be a great idea to include exactly what Mark Zuckerberg said! A Better Argument Example Body Paragraph: Over the past several years, one of the biggest consequences of the lack of regulation of social media platforms has been the mining of Facebook user data, which has been exposed by the news media and the U. Investigations by the Federal Trade Commission F. Specifically, Facebook allowed Cambridge Analytica, a political data firm, to gather the personal information of tens of millions of people—information the firm then used to aid a particular presidential campaign. This paragraph is a bit better than the first one, but it still needs some work. The reader already knows that mining user data is a big issue, so the topic sentence would be a great place to make a point about why more stringent government regulations would most effectively protect user data. A Best—But Not Perfect! First, the topic sentences get to the point. It gives a clear reason why our claim in favor of more stringent government regulations is a good claim: because Facebook has failed to self-regulate its practices. This paragraph also provides strong evidence and specific examples that support the point made in the topic sentence. Perhaps most importantly, though, this writer explains why the evidence is important. The bold sentence in the example is where the writer links the evidence back to their opinion. In this case, they explain that the pressure from Federal Trade Commission and Congress—and the threat of regulation—have helped change Facebook for the better. Like in this example paragraph, you just have to effectively develop your position by appropriately and convincingly relying on evidence from good sources. Takeaway 2: Make Your Argument the Focus of the Essay Define your position clearly in your thesis statement and stick to that position! The thesis is the backbone of your paper, and every paragraph should help prove your thesis in one way or another. They become oblivious to the world around them, even in the most important times. Smartphones can hypnotize their users during events like weddings, funerals, or work meetings. It would be a life learning experience. It was October 28, These movie makes you anxious, desperate, and exited at the same time, the perfect combination of emotions. When I wrote my last book, Alone Together, people were angry. If you are addicted to heroin you have to give it up completely, go cold turkey. Here it is a different assignment. I am not planning to give up my phone. And that you can slip in and out of wherever you are to be wherever you want to be, with no social stigma. We are telling people that they are not as interesting or informative as where we can go in a flash [on our devices]. You could say that this is a radical code of individualism—so radical that we deny the power of all communal affiliations even as we participate in them. So we are in one confusing soup. It certainly leads right back to people [being] in conflict, which is one of my big themes. The statistics I like are the Pew numbers. Over 80 percent say that a phone was out during their last social interaction, and they describe what kinds of ways in which that was positive for them—they were sharing, they were looking things up. After looking around i even found an article from the Wall Street Journal about the New York Text-Messaing Championship, and it was not surprise to me that a teenager Kate Moore 15 years old won the whole competition. Here's a link to the actual competition.

It is easier to avoid the phone; its beginnings and endings are too rough on her. Audrey is not alone in this. Friendships get broken.

No need to call argumentative essay

Pretty much the same. You can create who you want to be.

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I am sympathetic to that. We are asking kids to read homework on a device that also gives them access to everything that matters to them: Facebook. How did you negotiate these things with your own daughter? I have two daughters, 16 and 12, and my experience is that you have to choose your battles… We did the sacred space thing. And it mostly worked. No computers or phones in the kitchen, at the dining table, or in the car. Those are the places I think where you create family space. Gilles Philips, who has done brilliant work on how our devices hold us in state close to hyper-vigilance, not a good state to be in. Both engineers, both looking toward a very different future. Davis: During your research you spent some time at device-free camps for kids. Do you think that these should become more widely available? What about device-free camps for adults? Turkle: I think that different people will find different ways to take a bit of device-free time. For some it will be a camp. For some it will be a kind of sabbath day. Or a daily time out. But I think this will happen. We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters theatlantic. The book also provides theorists who might have focused on specific angles of CALL with a broader historical and conceptual picture of the field. The name is a fairly recent one: the existence of CALL in the academic literature has been recognizable for about the last thirty years. Hope and prayer are an expectation and belief in something over which one has little or no control. Determination is a very powerful characteristic, one that truly impacts ones life. That proved to be the case with my mother. I will never forget the day I got a call that would change my life. He deserved to have me do it in person Audrey was still so upset by the online breakup that in our conversation, she comes to her own defense. With a friend you actually have to work it out. She finds face-to-face conversation difficult and avoids the telephone at all cost. She was disappointed when one of her friends at her former school sent her an instant message to tell her she would be missed. And I understood. I really appreciated it, but it was different reading it than hearing it in her voice. Telephones are for logistical arrangements, if complicated often overlapping text messages have confused a situation. One of the emotional affordances of digital communication is that one can always hide behind deliberated nonchalance. Messaging on social networks is the closest these students get to e-mailing except to deal with teachers and college and job applications. It can be there to trigger a feeling rather than transmit a thought. Indeed, for many teenagers who discover their feelings by texting them, communication is the place where feelings are born. Not far into this conversation, the emphasis on nonchalance runs into the complication that Audrey signaled: the composition of any message even the most seemingly casual is often studied. And never more so than when dealing with members of the opposite sex. John, sixteen, is an insecure young man with a crush who turns to a Cyrano, digital style. When he wants to get in touch with a girl he really likes, John hands his phone over to a friend he knows to be skilled at flirting by text. In fact, he has several stand-ins. When one of these friends does his texting, John is confident that he sounds good to his Roxanne. This, one might say, is their generational expertise. Having grown up with new media that had no rules, they wrote some out of necessity. In her circle, instant messages are sent in the evening, when one is working on homework on a laptop or desktop. This presumed social and technical setting compels a certain gravitas. The medium is the message: if you are at your computer, the medium is formal, and so is the message. If you are running around, shopping, or having a coffee, and you swipe a few keys on your phone to send a text, the medium is informal, and so is the message, no matter how much you may have edited the content. In all of this noise, your instant message can easily get lost. And sometimes, people stay signed on to instant messenger even though they have left the computer. You can just send out something without the clear expectation that you will get something back. Awkward good-byes feel too much like rejection. A sixteen-year-old boy at Fillmore will not speak on the telephone except when his mother makes him call a relative. On the telephone, too much might show. A text message might give the impression of spontaneity to its recipient, but teenagers admit they might spend ten minutes editing its opening line to get it just right. You never think that anyone else put thought into theirs. So you sort of forget that you put time into yours. Before I send an important one, I switch it around, a lot. Another was with my cousin who lives in Montreal, and she was asking about this summer and stuff. He has spent the better part of the morning texting back and forth to her. Avoiding the phone cannot be about efficient time management. He has a way to make plans to live with his cousin during the summer without sharing any pleasantries or showing any interest in her. Both parties are willing to reduce their interchange to a transaction that scheduling software could perform. Many were introduced to the Internet through America Online when they were only a little past being toddlers. Their parents, however, came to online life as grown-ups. In this domain, they are a generation that, from the beginning, has been playing catch-up with their children. This pattern continues: the fastest-growing demographic on Facebook is adults from thirty-five to forty-four. If teenagers, overwhelmed with demands for academic and sexual performance, have come to treat online life as a place to hide and draw some lines, then their parents, claiming exhaustion, strive to exert greater control over what reaches them. And the only way to filter effectively is to keep most communications online and text based. So, they are always on, always at work, and always on call. I remember the time, not many years ago, when I celebrated Thanksgiving with a friend and her son, a young lawyer, who had just been given a beeper by his firm. Now, we have all taken up the burden, reframed as an asset—or as just the way it is. We are on call for our families as well as our colleagues. On a morning hike in the Berkshires, I fall into step with Hope, forty-seven, a real estate broker from Manhattan. She carries her BlackBerry. Her husband, she says, will probably want to be in touch. And indeed, he calls at thirty-minute intervals. She answers her phone religiously until finally a call comes in with spotty reception. There will be more messages; he will be able to send more texts than he can place calls. But a stream of messages makes it impossible to find moments of solitude, time when other people are showing us neither dependency nor affection. But if your phone is always with you, seeking solitude can look suspiciously like hiding. We fill our days with ongoing connection, denying ourselves time to think and dream. Busy to the point of depletion, we make a new Faustian bargain. It goes something like this: if we are left alone when we make contact, we can handle being together. A thirty-six-year-old nurse at a large Boston hospital begins her day with a visit to her mother. Then she shops for food, cleans the house, and gets ready for work. After an eight-hour shift and dinner, it is after 9 p. My friends from nursing school are all over the country. I send some e-mails. I log onto Facebook and feel less alone. I have their new pictures, the last thing they were doing. I feel caught up. Now she works full-time as an office manager. She is content to send e-mails and Facebook messages. But also, if they call me, I feel they are intruding After work—I want to go home, look at some photos from the grandchildren on Facebook, send some e-mails and feel in touch. Its design flaw: it can only happen in real time. He does not call; he does not ask to see them. It might be a bad time. It was nice. I think I should want to, it would be nice, but it is easier to deal with people on my BlackBerry. They are not doing anything else. Private cell time is the hardest thing to get. Now is my time.

You can say argumentative essay of stereotype mold you want to fit in without But you can pull it off on the Internet. Audrey has her cell phone and its camera with her all day; all day she takes pictures and posts them to Facebook. She needs that she has far more Facebook call albums than any of her friends. Audrey is argumentative about which photographs to post.

Sherry Turkle's Call to Reclaim Conversation - The Atlantic

Which put her in the best light? All my memories would probably go along with it. And other people have posted pictures of me.

The book also provides theorists who might have focused on specific angles of CALL with a broader historical and conceptual picture of the field. The name is a fairly recent one: the existence of CALL in the academic literature has been recognizable for about the last thirty years. Hope and prayer are an expectation and belief in something over which one has little or no control. And other people have posted pictures of me. All of that would be lost. If you are addicted to heroin you have to give it up completely, go cold turkey. Here it is a different assignment. I am not planning to give up my phone. I just need to know what it is good for. An actual image of you killing your argumentative essay prompts after reading this article! These are the parts that will flesh out your argument and support the claim you made in your thesis statement. Like other types of essays, argumentative essays typically have three main sections: the introduction, the body, and the conclusion. Within those sections, there are some key elements that a reader—and especially an exam scorer or professor—is always going to expect you to include. To make the most of the body section, you have to know how to support your claim your thesis statement , what evidence and explanations are and when you should use them, and how and when to address opposing viewpoints. This probably feels like a big deal! The body and conclusion make up most of the essay, right? There are three main areas where you want to focus your energy as you develop a strategy for how to write an argumentative essay: supporting your claim—your thesis statement—in your essay, addressing other viewpoints on your topic, and writing a solid conclusion. Supporting your claim in your thesis statement is where that research comes in handy. Remember your reader? What Evidence Is and When You Should Use It Evidence can be material from any authoritative and credible outside source that supports your position on your topic. In some cases, evidence can come in the form of photos, video footage, or audio recordings. In other cases, you might be pulling reasons, facts, or statistics from news media articles, public policy, or scholarly books or journals. There are some clues you can look for that indicate whether or not a source is credible, such as whether: The website where you found the source ends in. On some exams, like the AP exams , you may be given pretty strict parameters for what evidence to use and how to use it. You might be given six short readings that all address the same topic, have 15 minutes to read them, then be required to pull material from a minimum of three of the short readings to support your claim in an argumentative essay. When the sources are handed to you like that, be sure to take notes that will help you pick out evidence as you read. Turkle also talks about this in this chapter, she describes it as "Overwhelmed across the Generations" Many of these older generations who did not grow up with the technologies we have now, are trying to incorporate themselves and become a part of them. One example in the "natives" vs. Experimental evidence backs this up, because if you have a phone on the table between two people, the people in the conversation feel less connected to each other. How do you define empathy? And if we are, how can we put ourselves on a different kind of diet? Davis: You also say that another bedrock of conversation is solitude and self-reflection. Why do you think technologies, specifically, are responsible for eroding our ability to be alone? And that you can slip in and out of wherever you are to be wherever you want to be, with no social stigma. We are telling people that they are not as interesting or informative as where we can go in a flash [on our devices]. If you are running around, shopping, or having a coffee, and you swipe a few keys on your phone to send a text, the medium is informal, and so is the message, no matter how much you may have edited the content. In all of this noise, your instant message can easily get lost. And sometimes, people stay signed on to instant messenger even though they have left the computer. You can just send out something without the clear expectation that you will get something back. Awkward good-byes feel too much like rejection. A sixteen-year-old boy at Fillmore will not speak on the telephone except when his mother makes him call a relative. On the telephone, too much might show. A text message might give the impression of spontaneity to its recipient, but teenagers admit they might spend ten minutes editing its opening line to get it just right. You never think that anyone else put thought into theirs. So you sort of forget that you put time into yours. Before I send an important one, I switch it around, a lot. Another was with my cousin who lives in Montreal, and she was asking about this summer and stuff. He has spent the better part of the morning texting back and forth to her. Avoiding the phone cannot be about efficient time management. He has a way to make plans to live with his cousin during the summer without sharing any pleasantries or showing any interest in her. Both parties are willing to reduce their interchange to a transaction that scheduling software could perform. Many were introduced to the Internet through America Online when they were only a little past being toddlers. Their parents, however, came to online life as grown-ups. In this domain, they are a generation that, from the beginning, has been playing catch-up with their children. This pattern continues: the fastest-growing demographic on Facebook is adults from thirty-five to forty-four. If teenagers, overwhelmed with demands for academic and sexual performance, have come to treat online life as a place to hide and draw some lines, then their parents, claiming exhaustion, strive to exert greater control over what reaches them. And the only way to filter effectively is to keep most communications online and text based. So, they are always on, always at work, and always on call. I remember the time, not many years ago, when I celebrated Thanksgiving with a friend and her son, a young lawyer, who had just been given a beeper by his firm. Now, we have all taken up the burden, reframed as an asset—or as just the way it is. We are on call for our families as well as our colleagues. On a morning hike in the Berkshires, I fall into step with Hope, forty-seven, a real estate broker from Manhattan. She carries her BlackBerry. Her husband, she says, will probably want to be in touch. And indeed, he calls at thirty-minute intervals. She answers her phone religiously until finally a call comes in with spotty reception. There will be more messages; he will be able to send more texts than he can place calls. But a stream of messages makes it impossible to find moments of solitude, time when other people are showing us neither dependency nor affection. But if your phone is always with you, seeking solitude can look suspiciously like hiding. We fill our days with ongoing connection, denying ourselves time to think and dream. Busy to the point of depletion, we make a new Faustian bargain. It goes something like this: if we are left alone when we make contact, we can handle being together. A thirty-six-year-old nurse at a large Boston hospital begins her day with a visit to her mother. Then she shops for food, cleans the house, and gets ready for work. After an eight-hour shift and dinner, it is after 9 p. My friends from nursing school are all over the country. I send some e-mails. I log onto Facebook and feel less alone. I have their new pictures, the last thing they were doing. I feel caught up.

All of that would be lost. If Facebook essay undone, I might actually freak out That is where I am. If everything is archived, Audrey worries that she will never be able to need the Internet twin. That thought is not so nice. But if call is archived, at argumentative in fantasy, she will never have to give her up. That thought is kind of nice. On Facebook, Audrey works on the twin, and the twin works on her.

She receives a good response from Facebook friends, and so she ramps up the flirtatious tone. The response is not so good, and she retreats. Audrey uses the same kind of tinkering as she experiments with her avatars in virtual worlds.

3 Key Tips for How to Write an Argumentative Essay

Change your avatar, change your world. Audrey says that her online avatars boost her real-life confidence. Like many other young women on Second Life, Audrey makes her avatar more conventionally attractive than she is in the real. Audrey is a pretty girl, with long red hair, styled in a single braid down her back. Her braid and her preference for floral prints give her an old-fashioned look.

There are no floral prints. For Audrey, as for many of her peers, the answer is argumentative yes. Online life is practice to make persuasive essay concerning empiricism rest of life call, but it is also a need in itself. Teenagers spend hours depleting allowances, shopping for clothes and shoes for their online selves.

These virtual goods have real utility; they are required for avatars with full social lives. During her sophomore year at Roosevelt, Audrey met a group of Italian exchange students.

They introduced her to the site. I have two essays, 16 and 12, and my experience is that you have to choose your battles… We did the sacred space thing. And it mostly worked. No computers or phones in the kitchen, at the dining table, or in the car. Those are the places I think where you create family space.